How the “Real Weather” benefits Cloud Computing

Winter Storm Nemo is now poised to become the latest example of a powerful, potentially historic, February storm in the Northeast U.S. – predications of up to 2 feet of snow.

Studies show that 57% of those surveyed regarding “cloud computing” believe the “weather” will affect their cloud services – but in a different way it seems. Weather conditions typically do not affect cloud computing services with the exception of downed power lines or lost internet connections.

This weekend the weather will impact cloud computing in a positive way – let me explain. I just received an email from a client in Boston stating “We will have a very bad snow storm tomorrow. Our staff will be working at home. Most business will be closed on Friday-Sunday.”

Well cloud computing to the rescue! Assuming power and Internet remain available during Winter storm Nemo – our clients employees will be able to work from their homes or other remote locations without needing to commute to their office during the severe weather. Our client is a CPA firm and this is the middle of a busy tax season so productivity is very important.


The cloud computing solution will allow them the ability to remotely access all mission critical data and applications to continue their work during the “real weather” encumbrance. Employees will stay productive, get their jobs done, satisfy their clients – all working outside the walls of their office environment.